Would you use a blog to highlight poor customer service?

April 11, 2010

As many of my regular readers already know, my answer to this question is a resounding Yes.

The Kwik Fit example, where I utilised a rising audience to highlight life-threatening service from Kwik Fit Whiteladies Road branch in Bristol, has consistently gained 100+ hits per day since the wholes debacle went public online recently.

And whilst it hasn’t caused a shift from Kwik Fit management – at least not publicly, anyway – what has come to light are the following things:

* The Search rankings have stacked up against Kwik Fit for key phrases, such as ‘Kwik Fit reputation’ on Google in a short space of time

* Kwik Fit management are scouring the blog daily for keywords under their senior managers’ names

* Whilst not publicly addressing the issues I highlighted, Kwik Fit are painfully aware of the true cost of poor customer service

The further examples listed on the blog post – now up to around 60 comments – are making it clear that blogs are a powerful and useful online platform for voicing bad as well as good things about companies. The Facebook anti-fan page is doing well, too.

My question is this – have you, or are you considering, using a blog as a forum to express poor customer service?

Advertisements

6 Responses to “Would you use a blog to highlight poor customer service?”

  1. Marie said

    I’d be very wary.

    I recently left a review on the reviewcentre.com highlighting the terrible service I had with one company. A few weeks later I was contacted by the site saying that the company had complained and my review had been taken down.

    I was asked what I wanted to do – ie, put the review back up or leave it off but to consider that the company may want to take further action against me.

    I worried that my comments could be libelous and so just to be safe, I won’t be doing that again!

    • bristoleditor said

      Hi Marie

      Many thanks for your comments – I would say that if your review is accurately based on factual information of your experience, then highlighting difficult, negative or problematic experiences with a company is not in danger of libel action.

      If you’re highlighting experiences, not emotions or opinions, you should be safe from any libel action. I’d fight hard for Freedom of Speech on any such action.

      Best wishes

      • Vince Hudd said

        I totally agree with your response to Marie, Chris, and would add that under the circumstances I would be inclined to highlight (including naming the company) elsewhere. Effectively “reviewing” the removal of the review.

        Had they instead addressed the review by establishing what they had done wrong, and if they couldn’t put things right for Marie, then at least try to ensure the same problems don’t occur for future customers, responding to the review (if possible) appropriately, then the result of even a poor review can be positive for the company.

        Meanwhile, to answer the basic question of whether I’d use a blog or forum to highlight poor customer service: Damned right I would and, over the years, have done so on numerous occasions. Not just poor customer service, either – sometimes what can be described only as stupidity:

        http://misc.vinceh.com/2009/11/barclaycard-expects-customers-to-ignore-sensible-practices/

        Or supposedly legitimate companies who are basically scamming people:

        http://misc.vinceh.com/2009/12/telebilling-call-back-scam/

  2. bristoleditor said

    Hi Vince

    Many thanks for your comments and inputs – much appreciated.

    Good to see that you’re happy to express your right to comment on poor customer service, and then some: it often seems the assumption of companies such as Kwik fit that if they ignore the complaints and issues for long enough, the problems will disappear. How wrong.

    If anything, it simply magnifies their ineptitude.

    Thank again Vince – loved the links too. Bravo.

  3. […] Bristol Editor shows us how powerful blogs are as venues where customers can share good or bad customer experiences. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: